• Comparing different versions of prototype designs with Maze

    Broadly speaking, design comparison allows you to test multiple versions of your prototypes to identify which one perfoms best in terms of usability and desirability (preference testing). With this...

  • Testing mazes on mobile devices

    It’s possible to test mazes with users on mobile devices (i.e. smartphones and tablets). This article walks you through best practices to set up and successfully run mobile-friendly mazes. Can Maze...

  • How long should my maze test be?

    There isn't a set rule for the ideal number of blocks your maze should have. However, keep in mind that, in unmoderated testing, testers' attention will significantly drop the longer the maze lasts...

  • How to introduce your maze to testers

    Introducing your maze and product to testers is important for creating a good testing experience and getting valuable results. The concept of prototyping and user testing may be unfamiliar to some ...

  • Using a Card Sort block to gather large amounts of feedback quickly

    Matrix tables consist of multiple rating-scale questions (i.e. Likert, semantic differential scales, SUS) that share the same response options (e.g very satisfied to very dissatisfied). They’re gre...

  • Free roam: Allowing testers to freely explore a prototype with no defined goal

    Currently, each prototype test on Maze must have at least one defined path, and it is only considered complete once a tester reaches the end screen of the path. This means that the ability to let t...

  • Creating a first-click test

    First-click testing, where you upload an image and track where your testers would click first in order to complete a given task, is not directly supported in Maze at the moment. This article explor...

  • When should I use unmoderated vs. moderated testing?

    There are two main approaches to user testing: moderated and unmoderated. Both methods have benefits and disadvantages. Choosing the right approach depends on various factors, and isn’t always a cl...

  • Conducting diary research with Maze

    Diary research (also known as diary study) is a longitudinal UX research method used to collect qualitative data through participants keeping a diary to record their thoughts, feelings, and behavio...